Mona Lisa and The Retelling of Reality

18 & Vivacious. Dancer. Vive le Pluto!

frickhead:

ATTENTION EVERYONE IN THE LA AREA!!
My cousin, TALLON, was reported MISSING today. He is an AUTISTIC BLACK TEEN AND IS COMPLETEY NON-VERBAL. HE DOES NOT RESPOND TO HIS NAME. This young man went out for his daily bike ride, unattended, and did not come back. Tonight, HE IS IN LA BY HIMSELF. He is 6’0, 200lbs, and was last seen wearing a white t shirt and khaki shorts. PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST!!

frickhead:

ATTENTION EVERYONE IN THE LA AREA!!

My cousin, TALLON, was reported MISSING today. He is an AUTISTIC BLACK TEEN AND IS COMPLETEY NON-VERBAL. HE DOES NOT RESPOND TO HIS NAME. This young man went out for his daily bike ride, unattended, and did not come back. Tonight, HE IS IN LA BY HIMSELF. He is 6’0, 200lbs, and was last seen wearing a white t shirt and khaki shorts. PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST!!

(via pizza-drunk)

ancientart:

An extremely old stamp.
This ancient stamp dates to the 22nd century BC, and is from the holy city of Nippur, located southeastern Iraq. Nippur was the religious centre of Mesopotamia for thousands of years, and was believed to have been where Enlil created mankind.
Translated, the inscription on the stamp reads: Narâm-Sîn built the house/temple of the god Enlil. As the British Museum state: “Such stamps were used to impress or mark the bricks of important religious and public buildings. They are therefore an important source for the identification of architecture and a valuable criterion for the date of a building.” The impression in front of the stamp is modern.
Artefact courtesy of & currently located at The British Museum, London. Photo taken by Klaus Wagensonner.

ancientart:

An extremely old stamp.

This ancient stamp dates to the 22nd century BC, and is from the holy city of Nippur, located southeastern Iraq. Nippur was the religious centre of Mesopotamia for thousands of years, and was believed to have been where Enlil created mankind.

Translated, the inscription on the stamp reads: Narâm-Sîn built the house/temple of the god Enlil. As the British Museum state: “Such stamps were used to impress or mark the bricks of important religious and public buildings. They are therefore an important source for the identification of architecture and a valuable criterion for the date of a building.” The impression in front of the stamp is modern.

Artefact courtesy of & currently located at The British Museum, London. Photo taken by Klaus Wagensonner.

(via eros-eyesore)